Tuesday, 09 April 2024 00:00

Understanding the variance between high and low ankle sprains is vital for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Low ankle sprains, commonly known as lateral ankle sprains, affect the ligaments on the outside of the ankle and are prevalent in sudden twists or rolls of the foot. Conversely, high ankle sprains, medically termed syndesmotic sprains, occur when the ligaments connecting the tibia and fibula bones above the ankle joint are stretched or torn. While both injuries cause pain, swelling, and difficulty bearing weight, high ankle sprains typically involve pain above the ankle and are associated with a longer recovery period. Moreover, high ankle sprains often result from more forceful rotational movements, such as those seen in sports like football or skiing. If you have sprained your ankle, it is suggested that you confer with a podiatrist who can determine what type of sprain it is, and offer appropriate treatment solutions.

Ankle sprains are common but need immediate attention. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Clover Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains take place when the ligaments in your ankle are torn or stretched beyond their limits. There are multiple ways that the ankle can become injured, including twisting or rolling over onto your ankle, putting undue stress on it, or causing trauma to the ankle itself.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Mild to moderate bruising
  • Limited mobility
  • Swelling
  • Discoloration of the skin (depending on severity)

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

Treatment of a sprain depends on the severity.  Many times, people are told to rest and remain off their feet completely, while others are given an air cast. If the sprain is very severe, surgery may be required.

If you have suffered an ankle sprain previously, you may want to consider additional support such as a brace and regular exercises to strengthen the ankle.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Camas and Vancouver, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 02 April 2024 00:00

Plantar fibroma is a condition that affects the connective tissue on the bottom of the foot, particularly the arch area. This condition often manifests as a small, firm nodule or lump that develops gradually over time. While the exact cause remains unclear, factors such as trauma or genetics may play a role in its development. Plantar fibromas can vary in size and may cause discomfort or pain, especially when walking or standing for prolonged periods. In some cases, they can interfere with footwear, making it uncomfortable to wear certain shoes. Diagnosis typically involves a physical examination by a podiatrist, and sometimes imaging tests such as ultrasound or MRI’s are needed. It is essential for individuals with plantar fibromas to work closely with their podiatrists to determine the most appropriate management plan for their specific situation. If you have a plantar fibroma, it is strongly suggested that you schedule an appointment with this type of doctor who can effectively treat this condition.

A plantar fibroma may disrupt your daily activities. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Clover Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Plantar Fibroma

A plantar fibroma is a fibrous knot in the arch of the foot. It is embedded in the plantar fascia which is a band of tissue that extends from the heel to the toes along the bottom of the foot. There can be multiple plantar fibromas in the feet at the same time. There are no known causes for this condition. If you have a plantar fibroma, there will be a bump in the arch of your foot that cannot be missed. Any associated pain is most often due to a shoe rubbing against the nodule. Non-surgical options, such as steroid injections, physical therapy, and orthotics should be tried first. Surgery is a last resort and is the only thing that will remove a plantar fibroma entirely. Consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and to determine the treatment regimen that is right for you.

What Causes a Plantar Fibroma?

While there are no specific causes identified, a plantar fibroma can possibly come from genetic predisposition or the formation of scar tissue that forms from healing the tears in the plantar fascia.

What Are the Symptoms of a Plantar Fibroma?

There will be a noticeable lump in the arch of the foot that may or may not cause pain. If pain is felt, it is typically because a shoe is rubbing up against the lump or when walking or standing barefoot.

Treatment and Prevention

A plantar fibroma will not disappear without treatment, but it can get smaller and be a non-issue. If pain persists, a podiatrist examines the foot and when the arch of the foot is pressed, pain can be felt down to the toes. An MRI or biopsy might be performed to help diagnose or evaluate the plantar fibroma. The following non-surgical options are generally enough to reduce the size and pain of these nodules:

  • Steroid injections
  • Orthotics
  • Physical therapy to help apply anti-inflammatory creams on the bump 

Surgery is considered if the mass increases in size and the patient continues to feel pain after non-surgical methods are tried.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Camas and Vancouver, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Friday, 29 March 2024 00:00

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Tuesday, 26 March 2024 00:00

Surgical debridement is a critical  procedure in foot wound care, involving the removal of dead, damaged, or infected tissue to promote healing. It is commonly used for severe wounds, ulcers, and burns where other methods may not be effective. During the procedure, a podiatrist uses surgical tools to carefully remove the affected tissue, ensuring that healthy tissue remains intact. This process helps to eliminate sources of infection and encourages the growth of new tissue. Surgical debridement can be performed in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, and specialized wound care centers. Depending on the extent of the wound, anesthesia may be necessary to minimize discomfort. After debridement, the wound is typically cleaned and dressed to prevent infection and support the healing process. Proper wound care and follow-up are essential for optimal outcomes following surgical debridement. If you have problematic foot wounds, it is strongly suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist to see if you can benefit from surgical debridement.

Limb salvage can be an effective way in preventing the need for limb amputation. If you have diabetes, cancer, or any other condition that could lead to foot amputation if left unchecked, consult with one of our podiatrists from Clover Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Limb Salvage?

Limb salvage is the attempt of saving a limb, such as the foot from amputation. Podiatrists also try to make sure that there is enough function in the foot after the salvage that it is still usable. Diabetes is the number one cause of non-traumatic amputations in the United States. Those with diabetes experience poor blood circulation, which prevents proper healing of an ulcer. If the ulcer is left uncheck, it could become infected, which could result in the need for amputation.

However, there are other causes as well, such as cancer and traumatic injury. Links between higher mortality rates and amputation have been found. This translates into higher healthcare costs, and a reduced quality of life and mobility for amputees. Podiatrists have attempted to increase the prevalence of limb salvage in an attempt to solve these issues.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Limb salvage teams have grown in recent years that utilize a number of different treatments to save the infected limb. This includes podiatrists that specialize in wound care, rehabilitation, orthotics, and surgery. Through a combination of these methods, limb salvage has been found to be an effective treatment for infected limbs, and as an alternative to amputation. Podiatrists will first evaluate the potential for limb salvage and determine if the limb can be saved or must be amputated. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Camas and Vancouver, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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